Pied Piper Pics

Babies Can’t Eat Kimchee by Nancy Patz, illus. by Susan L. Roth

Pied Piper Pics - 18 hours 17 min ago

In this charming book about having a new baby in the family, a new big sister, frustrated with the baby’s limitations, dreams of everything she’ll do with her baby when she’s big enough. She plans to teach the baby important things like how to walk, how to look both ways at the corner, and how to lick up ice cream drips. She imagines singing songs with the baby. Getting carried away she asks, “Baby, do you want me to teach you a song?” The following double-page spread makes the baby’s displeasure abundantly clear: strips of brightly colored paper shoot violently over the page. On one side is a small drawing of the baby with a wide-open mouth, dwarfed by the volume of her screams. The illustrations are done in collage, ink, and oil pastels with riotous color and texture on every page. This book is perfect for a preschool storytime on siblings or new babies. There are many great books on these themes; two are Katy Duck: Big Sister and Yum Yum, Baby Bundt. The author, Nancy Patz, is also an artist. Her paintings have been shown at the Baltimore Museum of Art, among other places. Illustrator Susan L. Roth has illustrated many books of Native American folk tales.

Check the WRL catalog for Babies Can’t Eat Kimchee.


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Slugs in Love by Susan Pearson, illus. by Kevin O’Malley

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-11-24 00:01

Marylou is a lovesick slug. Love poems for Herbie, the object of her affection, fill her mind day and night. Although she’s too shy to talk to him in person, she begins writing her poems in slime where Herbie will be sure to see them. Herbie, intrigued, responds in kind, but his poems keep vanishing before Marylou can find them. When they finally meet, their first words to each other are also in rhyme. The illustrations, done in marker and colored pencil and enhanced in Photoshop, add to the slugs’ vibrant personalities. Though they all look essentially the same (a source of confusion for Herbie, who doesn’t know what Marylou looks like), they can be identified by their jaunty headgear. Marylou wears bows around her eyestocks, Herbie wears a baseball cap, and various other slugs wear fedoras, kerchiefs, etc. This book is perfect for a Kindergarten storytime, and will be enjoyed especially by kids aged four to eight. Listeners will delight in the gross-out quality of the slimy slugs and laugh at the clever poetry. The author, Susan Pearson, grew up in part in Newport News. Illustrator Kevin O’Malley also illustrated the Miss Malarkey series. Readers who like Slugs in Love will also enjoy another funny book about leaving notes, Click Clack Moo: Cows that Type.

Check the WRL catalog for Slugs in Love.


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The Grudge Keeper by Mara Rockliff, illus. by Eliza Wheeler

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-11-21 00:01

Cornelius, the Grudge Keeper, has a busy job. He receives complaints from all the town people – all their fights and squabbles, all their grudges and grumbles. He carefully files each one away in its proper place, so no one else in town has to keep a grudge.
But one day, a small breeze comes into town. This breeze grows and grows until finally it turns into a gale-force wind, which invades Cornelius’ house and sends the grudges about in a flurry. When the townspeople come to file their new grudges, they find their old ones all out of order! Suddenly, they wonder how important these grudges were in the first place.
But what will happen to Cornelius when no one has anything left to complain about?
This book is perfect for older children. There are plenty of big words that they may need to look up, so keep a dictionary close-by.

Check the WRL catalog for The Grudge Keeper.


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Try It, You’ll Like It! by Marc Brown

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-11-19 00:01

Marc Brown’s Try it, You’ll Like It! is a book in the Arthur’s Family Values series.
Everyone is preparing for a summer luau, but D.W. does not want to try anything new. She won’t try new food, she won’t learn a new dance, she won’t even wear a new color! D.W. does not want to look silly.
The day of the luau comes, and everyone is having fun. D.W. isn’t even wearing a Hawaiian shirt, though. Soon she feels left out. Will she give in and try something new?
This is a great book that continues the adventures of Arthur and D.W. from the television series. It can teach children that they may miss out on fun if they are picky or afraid to try new things. At the end of the book D.W. has learned a lesson and she is now more adventurous than anyone else!

Check the WRL catalog for Try It, You’ll Like It!


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Boswell the Kitchen Cat by Marjorie Newman, illus. by Suzanne Watts

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-11-17 00:01

Usually, cats and mice do not get along at all. But in Boswell the Kitchen Cat, Boswell the cat has a special agreement with Lizzie the kitchen mouse and her children.
Boswell loves to cook fancy foods to eat and to share with friends. He makes a huge mess in the kitchen every time he cooks, but he hates to clean up afterward. Lizzie and her children always look for scraps, but there are none to be found. One day Boswell does not have time to clean before his guests arrive, so Lizzie and the other mice go to work.
Boswell is startled to see mice in his kitchen and is going to gobble them up, but wait! He notices a sparkling clean kitchen. Maybe Boswell and Lizzie can work out a deal?
This is a great book to teach children about cooking and about the responsibility of cleaning up.

Check the WRL catalog for Boswell the Kitchen Cat.


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There Was an Old Lady who Swallowed a Clover by Lucille Colandro, illus. by Jared Lee

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-11-14 00:01

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Clover is a fun book for St. Patrick’s Day, or anytime. This rhyming book builds off of each thing the old lady swallows, and she keeps swallowing bigger and bigger things!
She begins by swallowing a clover, then a daisy to brighten the clover, and then a butterfly to rest on the daisy, and so on…. This old lady must have a very big stomach!
The old lady begins to dance with a leprechaun at the end of the book, and she giggles so much that everything she swallows comes back up, along with a St. Patrick’s Day surprise.
This is a great book to read aloud to children, and you can have fun guessing why the old lady swallows everything that she does, as well as what she swallows next. This is part of a series, and you should check all the other things this crazy old lady swallows!

Check the WRL catalog for There Was an Old Lady who Swallowed a Clover.


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Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop! by Todd Tuell, illus. by Tad Carpenter

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-11-12 00:01

Tiptoe… jump… crawl… chop! Ninja stealthily sneaks around the house looking for mischief. Ninja chops balloons, steals cookies, and kicks blocks – making his brother very upset! But when Ninja’s brother shows that he can be quiet and sneaky too, can the two of them play together?
At the end of the day there is not one ninja, but two! Ninja and his brother team up to form a running, jumping, karate-chopping team.
Ninja never tires of creeping around the house and then bursting into action, and your little ones will enjoy acting out Ninja’s moves themselves. Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop! is a fun book to read aloud to younger children and it can serve as a good lesson about being nice to siblings or friends.

Check the WRL catalog for Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop!


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Get Well Soon, Grandpa! by An Swerts, illus. by Jenny Bakker

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-11-10 00:01

Get Well Soon, Grandpa! by An Swerts and Jenny Bakker is a great book to help parents explain what happens when an older family member gets sick.
In the story, Faye visits her grandpa for the night, and when he is getting ready the next morning he has a stroke. Faye is very nervous as she calls her mom, who then arrives with the doctor.
Grandpa Bert is admitted to the hospital and stays there throughout the summer. When he gets out, he comes to stay with Faye and her mom. Faye learns about physical therapy and speech therapy from the therapists who come to help her Grandpa.
This is a longer book and would be great for older children. If a family member is ill or injured and has to go to the hospital, reading this book with your children can help you answer questions they may have. The story is very informative about what happens when a loved one has a stroke, but is also told gently, and can help to ease children’s fears.

Check the WRL catalog for Get Well Soon, Grandpa!


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Hopper and Wilson by Maria Van Lieshout

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-11-07 00:01

Hopper and Wilson begins with a simple question: “What do you think it’s like at the end of the world?”
Hopper and Wilson decide to find out, so the two friends hop in their sailboat and sail off to find the end of the world. They hope to find an endless supply of lemonade and a staircase to the moon.
When their journey hits a rough patch, however, and Hopper falls overboard, they stop looking for the end of the world and start looking for each other. They realize that sometimes staying safe at home is better than going on a big adventure.
This is a touching tale about friendship, and is perfect for older children or children with a big vocabulary. Be sure to check out Hopper and Wilson Fetch a Star as well!

Check the WRL catalog for Hopper and Wilson.


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What Do You Do–When a Monster Says Boo? by Hope Vestergaard, illus. by Maggie Smith

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-11-05 00:01

Hope Vestergaard’s What Do You Do When a Monster Says Boo? is a wonderful book about sibling behavior, and a great model for older siblings.
Throughout the book, the “monster” does all sorts of bad things – pulling things, throwing hair, and yelling, to name a few. The book shows the best ways to handle little monsters, as well as some ways that aren’t so good.
When your monster is your little brother or sister it may be hard to keep your cool. What Do You Do When a Monster Says Boo? can show kids what it looks like to be patient with a hyper or misbehaving younger sibling.
Children of all ages will laugh at the monster acting silly, and parents will appreciate the suggestions for older siblings that the book gently provides.
This rhyming book has wonderful illustrations, and is a great choice to read to the whole family.

Check the WRL catalog for What Do You Do–When a Monster Says Boo?


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Possum Come a-Knockin’ by Nancy Van Laan, illus. by George Booth

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-11-03 00:01

Possum Come a-Knockin’ is a rhyming-text book that shows a family in the country going about their business when they get an unusual visitor.
Granny and Pappy, Ma and Pa, and Brother and Sis are all too wrapped up in their activities to notice someone knocking at the door, but Tom-cat, Coon-dawg, and the narrator (who calls herself “me”) all know something isn’t right. They all hear someone knock-knock-knocking on the door.
You’ll watch through the window as each member of the family goes on knittin’ and whittlin’ and cookin’ taters, until finally the pets cause such a ruckus that they go to investigate. But when they open the door, the mischievous possum is nowhere to be found!
This book, written by Nancy Van Laan, is fun to read aloud, and you and your children will laugh at the great illustrations. Grab a copy and have fun watching this zany family!

Check the WRL catalog for Possum Come a-Knockin’.


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Blackberry Banquet by Terry Pierce, illus. by Lisa Downey

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-10-31 00:05

Blackberry Banquet is a delightful treat for young summer readers. Perfect for expressive shared reading between adults and children, this story infuses elements of sequence, patterning, rhyme, and characterization, making it a great story for young readers.

Set in the forest, Blackberry Banquet tells the story of different animals that visit the blackberry bush to enjoy some fresh, sweet berries. A new animal and its accompanied sounds appear on each new page, and each page features an animal slightly bigger than the previous one until finally, a BEAR appears at the blackberry bush and frightens all of the animals away.

Besides writing a delightful story, the author has included non-fiction information on the back pages, including a recipe for blackberry ice-cream, a diagram to introduce food chains, and other factual information about the animals in the book.

This colorful book with bright, engaging illustrations by Lisa Downey reminds me of Jan Brett’s stories The Mitten and The Hat. To experience it for yourself, be sure to check out a copy of Blackberry Banquet!

 

Check the WRL catalog for Blackberry Banquet.


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Hillside Lullaby by Hope Vestergaard, illus. by Margie Moore

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-10-29 00:01

Looking for the perfect “good-night” book? Try Hillside Lullaby by Hope Vestergaard, a good night lullaby that is sure to evoke the sweetest dreams.
Hillside Lullaby tells the story of a “wild child not ready to close her eyes” and the mother who tucks her into bed. All around her, the animals outside are preparing for their night of slumber, too: the frogs, raccoon, deer, and rabbits.
Told in rhyme, Hillside Lullaby shows different views of mothers getting their children ready for bed. Children reading this book will be able to predict what animal’s bedtime routine is featured next, as each page reveals a small picture of the animal that will be detailed on the next pages. This picture book includes sweet, vibrant illustrations of the hillside and its creatures at night, making it impossible to fear the dark.
After all of the animals drift off to sleep, so too does the little girl “with the song of the hill in her head.”

Check the WRL catalog for Hillside Lullaby.


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Elsie’s Bird by Jane Yolen, illus. by David Small

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-10-27 00:02

Elsie’s Bird, a perfect read for young fans of historical fiction and/or for children who have recently relocated, tells the story of a young girl named Elsie from Boston. Elsie loves the sounds of Boston: the sounds of horses’ hooves clopping on the sidewalk, the sounds of the skip-rope songs she and her friends would sing, the sounds of fisherman, the sounds of birds, the sounds of the church bell. When Elsie’s Papa decides to move them out west to the Nebraska prairie after her mother dies, Elsie feels lonely and misses the sounds of the city.
Afraid of getting lost in the tall prairie grass, Elsie chooses to stay inside most of the time and comforts herself by singing songs to her canary, Timmy Tune. When Timmy Tune escapes, Elsie abandons her fear to search for him in the tall prairie grass and ends up making unexpected friendships.
Elsie’s Bird showcases the companionship that animals can offer to humans, especially to children, and encourages children to believe that they can overcome new and difficult situations. The illustrations by Caldecott award winner David Small will transport readers to a time long ago where they can “skip-rope” on the streets of Boston and overlook the vast prairie land of the west.
Jane Yolen’s creation is a great addition to studies of the past that even children today will be able to relate to.

Check the WRL catalog for Elsie’s Bird.


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How to Lose a Lemur by Frann Preston-Gannon

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-10-24 00:01

Why someone wouldn’t want to be friends with a lemur is beyond me, but the young boy in How to Lose a Lemur certainly wants to get rid of the lemur friend he has accidentally acquired. You know what they say: “Once a lemur takes a liking to you, there is not much that can be done about it.”
But he tries! He travels on bike, by train, and over mountains to lose his lemur, but his lemur just follows right along! Once he realizes that he is lost and can’t get back home, it’s up to his lemur friend – the very friend he’s been trying to escape from – that can help him find his way back!
Perfect for a discussion about friendship, How to Lose a Lemur tells an imaginative story with engaging, collage-like illustrations. The text on each page is large enough for the youngest eyes, and many high-frequency words appear throughout the book, making it a perfect interactive read-aloud for emergent readers.
To enjoy an interactive read-aloud with your little ones, share this story with them soon!

Check the WRL catalog for How to Lose a Lemur.


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Celia by Christelle Vallat, illus. by Stephanie Augusseau

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-10-22 00:01

Celia is a listener. When the people in her town have worries, troubles, or sadness, they come to Celia, whisper their sorrows into her ear, and feel relieved. Happy. After Celia listens, they repay her with colorful seeds, which Celia later transforms into large, bright balloons, shining stars, and whimsical flowers. One day, a young boy named Julian loses his seed on his visit to Celia and cannot get rid of his sadness. But when Celia finds a lost seed in the grass, she knows who it belongs to and holds on to it until their paths cross again.
When I first saw this book written by Christelle Vallat, I was mesmerized by the eye-catching cover: a black and white stencil sketch of a plump lady with light pink cheeks holding out her hands to colorful circles in various sizes. This juxtaposition of bold color against black and white sketches brings depth to the illustrations, like red berries peeking out from the top of snow in the middle of a barren January. There are some pages that feature just a mere splash of color, but the color is so rich and adds remarkably beauty even to these pages.
The most compelling aspect of Celia, however, is the nurturing relationship that emerges between an elderly lady and a young child. There are many authors who showcase the positive impact elders can have on younger generations, and Ms. Vallat is no exception with her creation of Celia. Further, this story seems to convey that, with the help of others, people have the power to transform their troubles into something good: a positive, encourage message for all readers.
To enjoy the beautiful illustrations for yourself and to read the positive message within its pages, check out Celia to experience the magic!

Check the WRL catalog for Celia.


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Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems by Kate Coombs, illus. Meilo So

Pied Piper Pics - Mon, 2014-10-20 00:01

Water Sings Blue, written by Kate Coombs and illustrated by Meilo So, is the perfect seaside companion for a sunny day at the beach! Filled with ocean-themed poems and vivid watercolor illustrations, Water Sings Blue is sure to delight beach-lovers and budding poets alike!
Each page features a poem with accompanied watercolor illustrations that evoke the mood and colors of the sea. From shades of light blue swirls in the ocean to a mixture of gray, blue, and purple coloring the sky, Water Sings Blue is an aesthetic delight. Besides showcasing sky and sea, the illustrator also depicts whimsical sea creatures, such as multi-colored fish, sea turtles, and octopi.
Like the rhythmic sounds of the ocean waves, the poems in this collection are told in a way that mimics the symphony of the ocean. Some poems, such as “What the Waves Say,” actually capture the “swell and sigh, otter lullaby” of the ocean; others are told from the perspectives of various ocean creatures and cannot help but cause readers to grin, like Frank Hermit, a seashell realtor operating in the depths of the sea. Still, some poems are quite metaphorical and compare marine animals with objects; in the case of “Jellyfish Kitchen,” a jellyfish is juxtaposed with a bundt cake!
Whether you share this book with your child all at once or take your time devouring the poems inside, be prepared to take a trip to the seashore with its myriad of descriptive poems and beautiful drawings.

Check the WRL catalog for Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems.


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Mirette on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully

Pied Piper Pics - Fri, 2014-10-17 00:03

Emily Arnold McCully’s Caldecott Medal-winning Mirette on the High Wire is an enchanting story perfect for holding the attention of an older audience. Mirette works in her mother’s boardinghouse where one day the retired high-wire walker Bellini comes to stay with them. After Mirette sees him walking on the clothesline, she decides to try it too, in spite of Bellini’s protesting. Then she overhears some other guests saying that Bellini is really “the great Bellini” who once fried an omelet on a wire in the middle of Niagara Falls and crossed a flaming wire, blindfolded, over Naples. When Mirette asks Bellini why he stopped high-wire walking, he says that fear on the wire never leaves someone. But he can’t stand disappointing Mirette, so he concocts a plan to conquer his fear. And it turns out that Mirette may be the very thing he needs to overcome his fear of the wire for good.
This rich, detailed story is a perfect elementary school read that will introduce kids to the exciting world of high-wire walkers. Above all, Mirette on the High Wire is a book about determination and conquering fear.

Check the WRL catalog for Mirette on the High Wire.


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Hooway for Wodney Wat by Helen Lester, illus. by Lynn Munsinger

Pied Piper Pics - Wed, 2014-10-15 00:01

Wodney Wat has a problem: his name is really Rodney Rat, but he can’t pronounce his r’s. All the kids at school tease him while he tells them that another name for bunny is “wabbit” and that “a twain twavels on twain twacks.” But things start to change for Wodney the day Camilla Capubara, the biggest, meanest, smartest rodent of all comes to school. All day long she steps on tails, knocks people over, and tramples the whole class on the way to recess. When Wodney gets chosen to lead a game of Simon Says, he is terrified of what Camilla will do to him. But Camilla doesn’t understand that Wodney can’t pronounce his r’s… So for instance, when Wodney says to “wake the leaves,” everyone else grabs a rake, but Camilla grabs a leaf and yells, “Wake up!” Wodney realizes that he might just be able to use this advantage to get rid of Camilla altogether…
This hilarious read is great for large groups. Preschoolers and elementary kids will appreciate the frequent wordplay. Hooway for Wodney Wat is a great read for anyone who has ever felt insecure about something, and teaches an important lesson about respect and self-acceptance.

Check the WRL catalog for Hooway for Wodney Wat.


Categories: Pied Piper Pics